White shrimp: These are on the sweeter side, but tend to taste nuttier than pink shrimp. There are also Chinese white shrimp and Mexican white shrimp which are farmed species and not wild caught (usually less sustainable).Pink shrimp: These are the little pink guys you’ll typically see behind the seafood counter. They’re pink when raw, hence the name.Rock shrimp: While they start out in hard shells, they’re typically deshelled before they’re sold. They’re often compared to lobster because of their firm texture, and you can substitute them for lobster as a more affordable protein.Brown shrimp: They have a more mineral flavor than white and pink shrimp, and they can contain more iodine. They turn pink once they’re cooked and are commonly used in dishes like gumbo.Royal red shrimp: Named after their bright red color, they’re also often compared to lobster because of their rich flavor and firm texture.Tiger shrimp: These little fellas are characterized by their stripes and can actually become quite large, but they tend to be farmed and not very sustainable.
White shrimp: These are on the sweeter side, but tend to taste nuttier than pink shrimp. There are also Chinese white shrimp and Mexican white shrimp which are farmed species and not wild caught (usually less sustainable).Pink shrimp: These are the little pink guys you’ll typically see behind the seafood counter. They’re pink when raw, hence the name.Rock shrimp: While they start out in hard shells, they’re typically deshelled before they’re sold. They’re often compared to lobster because of their firm texture, and you can substitute them for lobster as a more affordable protein.Brown shrimp: They have a more mineral flavor than white and pink shrimp, and they can contain more iodine. They turn pink once they’re cooked and are commonly used in dishes like gumbo.Royal red shrimp: Named after their bright red color, they’re also often compared to lobster because of their rich flavor and firm texture.Tiger shrimp: These little fellas are characterized by their stripes and can actually become quite large, but they tend to be farmed and not very sustainable.